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Posted on 02-10-2017

Cold laser therapy is a noninvasive procedure that uses light to stimulate cellular regeneration and increase blood circulation.  At the correct laser wavelength, pain signals are reduced and nerve sensitivity decreases.  The procedure will also release endorphins, a natural painkiller. Cold laser is not recommended for dogs with cancer due to the laser increasing blood flow that will feed into cancer cells.

Cold laser, also known as low-level or Class IV, laser therapy is a relatively new concept that is being used to treat dogs with arthritis. It is also being used to help heal tendon, soft tissue injuries and other wounds. This technology offers relief during recovery from trauma to simple relief from everyday aches and pains. In the early stages of therapy, pets show an increased range of motion and mobility as a benefit from the reduction in inflammation and pain.

Cold laser therapy can be used to treat a wide range of medical ailment including acute & chronic injuries, sprain & strains, arthritis, swelling due to spinal problems, and muscular-skeletal abnormalities.  We are also using it on most of our surgeries to hasten post-operative healing. Our cold laser is programmable to a range of frequencies in order to treat many different types of problems in dogs and cats.

The good news about laser therapy for dogs is there's no need to shave or clip the area to be treated and no sedation is needed for the process. This means that treatment can be performed multiple times a day or week.

Before treatment begins, your dog will be given a full physical; along with X-rays if needed. If you have a dog with arthritis, you can expect to start laser treatment with two to three sessions per week, then decrease sessions to once a week, then once every two weeks. We base how many therapy sessions on the response of the animal. If the arthritis is more advanced, then more sessions will be needed.

After laser therapy, owners might see their dog go upstairs more often, play with a ball they haven't picked up in months or go back to getting on the couch for their nightly snuggle with family members. When dogs have better mobility, medications can often be reduced.

Laser therapy won't cause your pet any unwanted side effects. The laser used for this type of treatment will not burn your pet's skin. Owners are welcome to be present during therapy. Technicians administering treatment and owner present must wear protective eye wear. With each treatment averaging 3-5 minutes, laser therapy is becoming more popular recently. If you would like to learn more about laser therapy and to see if it is right for your pet, call (407) 855-7387 to schedule a consultation with Dr. Bruce today!

Written and Edited by Dr. Bruce Bogoslavsky. January, 31 2017

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